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Pets in public housing

The Queensland Government recognises that pets provide companionship and security, and contribute to many people’s health and wellbeing.

Therefore, you can usually keep a pet in a public housing property.

If you’re moving into public housing and already own a pet, please notify us by contacting your nearest Housing Service Centre. Pets are not allowed in some multi-unit complexes and under some headleasing arrangements.

Rules for keeping a pet

For most public housing you don’t need our approval to keep a pet in your home, but you do need to notify us by contacting your nearest Housing Service Centre.

Your pet must also comply with local government (council) laws. To find out about local government laws:

Multi-unit complex

If the department does not own the whole complex where you live, you need to contact your nearest Housing Service Centre before arranging to own a pet. We will check the by-laws for the complex and advise you. To find out more about by-laws see Living in units.

Headlease arrangement

If your home is managed through a headlease arrangement, you need to contact your nearest Housing Service Centre before arranging to own a pet. We will check with the owner/agent and advise you.

Service and assistance animals

You don’t need to provide evidence of disabilities or medical conditions if you wish to keep a guide dog, hearing dog or assistance animal.

Unusual and exotic animals

You may keep an unusual or exotic pet (e.g. chickens, snakes, reptiles) if it complies with either local government laws and/or the Nature Conservation Act 1992. To find out about keeping an unusual animal:

If you don’t find information about your pet from these sources, you must check with the Department of Environment and Science (DES) to ensure the pet complies with the Nature Conservation Act.

The DES website also has information on licence requirements for certain protected birds, reptiles and amphibians.

Complaints about your pets

If we receive complaints about your pets (e.g. noise), we’ll investigate whether you’re in breach of your state tenancy agreement and we may take action under the Residential and Rooming Accommodation Act 2008.

If we believe your pet may not comply with local government laws, we’ll refer the complaint to the local council, as we don’t deal with issues around managing pets.

More information