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Utility infrastructure maintenance

Utility infrastructure is the pipes, cables, wires, sewers, drains, plant and equipment which supply a utility service to the lots or the common property in a community titles scheme.

Utility services include:

  • water, gas or electricity supplies
  • air conditioning
  • telephone, data or television services
  • drainage
  • waste disposal
  • a sewer system.

It can also be another system or service designed to benefit a lot or common property.

Utility infrastructure and common property

The body corporate is usually responsible for utility infrastructure that is part of common property.

If the utility infrastructure is not part of common property, the lot owner is generally responsible for maintaining it.

All utility infrastructure in a community titles scheme is part of common property except for utility infrastructure that:

  • supplies a utility service to only 1 lot

and

  • is within the boundaries of the lot

and

  • is not within a boundary structure for the lot.

A boundary structure for a lot in a scheme means a floor, wall or ceiling, other than a false ceiling, in which is located the boundary of the lot with another lot or common property. This definition applies to all schemes regardless of the plan of subdivision.

It is important for both the body corporate and lot owners to understand the boundaries of lots and know if utility infrastructure is part of common property.

Building format plan

This diagram gives an example of utility infrastructure responsibilities in a building format plan.

In the above diagram, the body corporate is responsible for the cold water pipes of cables shown in red as they are located within a boundary structure.

The lot owner is responsible for:

  • the cold water pipes or cables showing in blue as they service 1 lot only and are located within an internal wall (not a boundary structure)
  • a hot water system, including the associated pipes and wiring, supplying the service solely to the lot, even if the system is on common property
  • an air-conditioning system including the associated pipes and wiring, supplying the service solely to the lot, even if the system is on common property.

Standard format plan

This diagram gives an example of utility infrastructure responsibilities in a standard format plan.

In this diagram, the body corporate is responsible for the:

  • water pipes or cables shown in red as these supply the service to more than 1 lot
  • guttering and associated downpipes shown in pink which span 2 lots (1 and 2 and 3 and 4) supplying a service to more than 1 lot.
  • any television antenna that services 2 or more lots.

The lot owner is responsible for the:

  • water pipes or cables shown in blue as they are located within the lot boundary and service 1 lot only
  • guttering and associated downpipes shown in brown above lot 7.

See body corporate maintenance for more information on scheme boundaries, common property and lots.

Exclusive use by-laws

Exclusive use by-laws cannot give exclusive use rights to utility infrastructure that is part of common property.

For more information see:

When different rules apply

In some cases a lot owner (or occupier) can be responsible for maintenance even if the items are on common property or outside their lot.

This can include:

  • utility infrastructure (including equipment and associated wiring and pipes) on common property that only services 1 lot and it is a hot water system, washing machine, clothes dryer, air conditioner or similar equipment
  • a shower tray even if it is not inside the lot
  • utility infrastructure that is installed on common property by an occupier for the occupier’s benefit.

A meter installed to measure water supplied to a community titles scheme may remain the property of the property of the provider supplying the water, and will not be part of common property. This applies to meters installed in schemes established after 1 January 2008.

Utility infrastructure installed under an agreement with the original owner (developer) or the body corporate (for example, cable television equipment), may remain the property of the service provider. It will only be part of common property if ownership is transferred to the body corporate under the terms of the agreement.

Further questions?

If you have further body corporate questions you can submit an enquiry or phone the information service on 1800 060 119 (freecall).

We cannot give legal advice or rulings—we can only give you general information on body corporate legislation.

Last updated
5 February 2018
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