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Detention centre rules

If your child is sentenced to a detention order, they will go to a youth detention centre. If your child is remanded in custody, they will also go to a youth detention centre.

In detention, your child must follow certain rules. They must:

  • go to school
  • take part in programs
  • show respect to staff and other young people
  • follow reasonable instructions
  • do chores in their unit
  • have good manners
  • maintain good hygiene
  • go to bed at bedtime.

They must not:

  • smoke
  • swear
  • graffiti
  • have inappropriate physical contact with other young people.

Good behaviour

Youth detention staff will help your child to be aware of their behaviour, and encourage them to make good decisions by promoting and reinforcing good behaviour.

We will treat your child with respect and dignity at all times. Your child will also be encouraged to treat others with respect and dignity.

When your child demonstrates good behaviour they can earn access to rewards.

Offending and misbehaving in detention

Your child has rights, including human rights, while they are in detention. We will not take away your child’s basic rights and entitlements to punish them.

If your child breaks the rules or has bad behaviour in the detention centre, they will lose points and privileges. We may also give them extra chores to do.

Your child may be charged with a criminal offence and have to go to court if they break the law while in detention, including if they:

  • assault someone, including a staff member or another young person
  • sexually harass someone, including a staff member or another young person
  • discriminate against someone, including a staff member or another young person
  • deliberately damage property, including breaking things or doing graffiti
  • touch or damage fire alarms, sprinklers, cameras or security devices in the centre.

What discipline does not include

We will discipline your child if they misbehave at the centre.

This discipline will not include:

  • depriving your child of sleep, food or visitors
  • physical punishment
  • shaming or bullying your child
  • keeping mail from them
  • denying access to a telephone or other communication
  • excluding your child from cultural, educational or vocational programs.

Youth detention staff may use reasonable force to protect your child, other people or property if your child is behaving in a way that could hurt someone.

Staff may also need to limit your child's access to certain objects or areas of the centre to keep everyone safe if your child is behaving in a way that could hurt someone.

More information