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Queensland Reconciliation Awards

The 2021 Queensland Reconciliation Awards recipients were announced at a ceremony in Townsville on Tuesday 1 June 2021.

These Awards recognise initiatives undertaken by businesses, community organisations and groups, educational institutions and government going above and beyond their core business to foster reconciliation and pave the way for a better future for our state.

The 2021 recipients are:

Business

In February 2019, North Queensland Bulk Ports Corporation (NQBP) started preparing its first Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP). It was agreed an Innovate RAP would be prepared, recognising the long-term relationships NQBP has with the Traditional Owners of its ports, existing reconciliation actions being implemented, and to provide suitable stretch targets to ensure effectiveness in broadening NQBP’s reconciliation influence.

NQBP is a government-owned corporation driven by its mission to manage safe and efficient ports that connect regional Queensland to the world by balancing the needs of iconic natural environments, communities, stakeholders and port users. Weipa, Abbot Point, Mackay and Hay Point trading ports all come under the care and authority of NQBP. The key driver for a RAP was to formalise NQBP’s engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples into positive and measurable actions, building higher levels of trust, and increased pride in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

During the RAP development, NQBP implemented several actions to work towards reconciliation including cultural competency training for staff, increasing NQBP employment of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples from 2.4 to 3.1 per cent, raising procurement spend on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses from 1.63 to 2.67 per cent and naming a new port road in the Yuwi language.

Queensland Nurses and Midwives Union (QNMU) identified concern for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives experiencing racism – most commonly seen as overt, covert and institutional racism. QNMU also identified it was not adequately equipped at the time to support members experiencing racism.

QNMU established the First Nations Reference Group (FNRG) in 2018, to engage with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses and midwives to improve services. It was recognised that for this relationship to grow and become a true partnership, the FNRG would need to be embedded in the QNMU democratic process. As such, the FNRG transitioned to the First Nations Branch in 2020 and monthly meetings for the new branch commenced in January 2021.

In collaboration with the FNRG, QNMU created a senior level First Nations Strategy, Policy and Research Officer role, which commenced in September 2020. One of the current priorities of this role is to grow the First Nations Branch membership and strengthen the First Nations’ voice at QNMU council, as well as consult with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander members regarding how QNMU conducts business.

Multhana Property Services has been proudly contributing to reconciliation across South East Queensland through concentrated efforts to create sustainable economic outcomes, career development opportunities for Indigenous employees and a diversified workforce for clients.

The employment of Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples has been central to Multhana’s ethos since its foundation in 2017 and has only strengthened throughout its rapid growth following the acquisition of major contracts. These include CPB Contractors (Cross River Rail), Uniting Care, Brisbane City Council and Metro South Health.

Multhana was founded to improve reconciliation and the opportunities available to Indigenous peoples. Multhana means ‘coming together to help each other’ in the Kalkadoon language, which refers to the multidimensional relationship between Multhana, its staff, their communities and clients. Multhana provides commercial cleaning, civil landscaping and building maintenance services for major organisations across South East Queensland. These contracts, in turn, provide employment and upskilling opportunities for Multhana’s team.

As a business that works across many locations, Lendlease has a responsibility to listen, learn and walk alongside First Nations peoples to ensure its activities support the ongoing connection to their land, waters, cultures, languages and traditions.

The Lendlease Elevate Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) aims to support the economic independence of First Nations peoples through bespoke employment programs, cultural awareness activities and business procurement support initiatives.

Throughout 2020, Lendlease Queensland delivered many programs including: a partnership with First Nations Fashion and Design (FNFD); a cultural learning schools program; storytelling through placemaking; a virtual National Reconciliation Week walk at Yarrabilba; a First Nations virtual employment workshop for the Cairns Conventions Centre Expansion hosted with the Jonathan Thurston (JT) Academy; a ‘Working on Country’ induction video to build awareness among workers about the New Performing Arts Venue in Brisbane; development of a learning space specifically for girls in the Yarrabah community in partnership with the JT Believe program and Yarrabah Elder Aunty Fiona Patterson.

In line with their Elevate RAP, the business achieved an overall increase in employment and procurement numbers. Through an inclusive procurement methodology, the Lendlease Building business in Queensland also facilitated awarding contracts to more than 53 Indigenous business enterprises totalling a spend of more than $2.9 million in 2020.

Their Queensland retail centres open each day of trade with an Acknowledgement to Country to Traditional Custodians, and provide access to digital platforms, so their partners including Bangarra can reach a broad customer base across Queensland. Various other programs took place throughout the year to support First Nations businesses, including the work at Cairns Central with First Nations Fashion Design (FNFD) to set up a pop-up store that supported 23 First Nations businesses.

Lendlease’s development business in Queensland continues to engage with residents and schools to facilitate access to cultural learning, including a virtual activity with schools for National Reconciliation Week (NRW) 2020.

One of their many RAP focus areas is to leverage customer and business reach to provide a platform for First Nations businesses and community to share stories, promote First Nations excellence and spark conversation about reconciliation in Australia.

Community:

COOEE Indigenous Family and Community Education Centre provides support services, educational programs and a meeting place. Familiarly referred to as COOEE, the centre provides a holistic wrap‑around service to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and families in an authentic and safe cultural space. COOEE has the capacity to build and enhance community-wide resilience and understanding of social, systemic and historical barriers to equality through cultural engagement of both Indigenous and non‑Indigenous communities.

COOEE seeks to identify and address social issues that impact on the education, socialisation and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth and families, developing processes and programs to address these issues through strategically aligned partnerships. It does this with limited funding and donations, with the work being done by a combination of full-time staff and volunteers.

COOEE regularly brings together agencies that provide specialist and family support programs, including government and non-government agencies, representatives from local schools and community organisations.

WOW (Women of the World) festivals and events celebrate the successes of women and girls while imagining a world where gender is no longer a determinant of life’s outcomes. Events include panel discussions, speed-mentoring, hands-on workshops and demonstrations, arts and cultural performances, music, exhibitions and more. WOW Festivals in Australia are driven by Of One Mind (OOM) in partnership with The WOW Foundation London.

First Nations women’s voices and life experiences are at the front and centre of all they do, working closely with communities and cultural advisors who inform the content and ensure appropriate cultural protocols and approaches to the shaping of each event. The lens they apply is intersectional, recognising there are multifaceted reasons for gender disadvantage across race, culture, language, location, ability and education. They also embrace a strengths-based approach, celebrating achievements first then building solutions for change.

The Archdiocese of Brisbane has developed an Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) to provide a framework for Archdiocesan parishes, communities and agencies to take actionable steps towards reconciliation. The Archdiocese of Brisbane is the face of the Catholic Church in South East Queensland. It encompasses 70 state government electorates, 98 parishes and at least 14 First Nation countries.

Initial work on a RAP began in 2016, with the formation of a Reconciliation Working Group. A RAP Officer was appointed in January 2020 and in June, the Archbishop formally invited internal and external individuals and agencies to form a Reconciliation Reference Group to guide and advise the finalisation and implementation of the RAP. The RAP was piloted in six parishes from August 2020, and officially launched with a Welcome to Country, Mass and reception at St Stephen’s Cathedral on 17 November 2020.

The RAP is the next step in the Archdiocese of Brisbane’s continuing journey towards reconciliation with Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The RAP was implemented to formalise existing social justice actions and ensure accountability. While the dimensions of reconciliation align with the Archdiocese’s spirituality, this is the first initiative to specifically address reaching solidarity with Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Supply Aus is an Indigenous supplier of workwear, personal protective equipment (PPE), medical and office supplies, outdoor and garden supplies. Supply Aus’ approach is to create positive social impact by reaching far beyond its brands and products, such as its active involvement in community partnerships and relationship building. Supply Aus is a profit-for-purpose business, meaning its work aims to improve the lives of Indigenous communities across Australia through mental health and wellbeing programs.

Building programs to help young people navigate difficult challenges, Supply Aus has brokered partnerships with other organisations such as TradeMutt (a suicide prevention awareness service based in Brisbane), and is designing clothing to get conversations started about suicide and mental health. Other programs include working with Samsung SDS Digital Health to distribute world leading medical devices through extensive procurement networks to enhance Indigenous lives and supporting the sports industry by sponsoring the Brisbane Bullets to enhance reach and support to Indigenous sportspersons. Supply Aus is carrying out these initiatives to go beyond its core business and have a larger social impact that will support Indigenous communities.

Education:

Gracemere State School (GSS) has been working with the wider community to create an inclusive educational culture including developing and delivering a Darumbal language and Aboriginal cultural program, aligned to the Australian curriculum.

In mid-2019, GSS met with Darumbal Enterprises, Elders, the P&C Association and wider community members to explore the idea of teaching Darumbal language in the school due to the disconnections and disengagement seen in students. GSS wanted to bridge the educational divide by making the school culturally familiar and appropriate for their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, by embedding Aboriginal heritage and culture, while creating a sense of connection and belonging to the school.

This initiative has allowed the reconciliation process to advance within the GSS community, with all school staff participating in the program to broaden their knowledge and support their learning journey. The program helps all students to recognise themselves, their culture and their identity within the curriculum, allowing for full participation in classes and to assist with building re-engagement and self-esteem.

At the beginning of 2020, a number of staff from Robina State High School (SHS) indicated through their professional development plans the desire to develop and enhance their knowledge and understanding of the cross-curricular priorities as identified in the Australian curriculum, specifically focusing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures.

Through part of the school’s collegial engagement framework, these teachers formed a professional learning team to focus on increasing staff capability and knowledge of how to understand and respect the Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples to promote reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. One of the actions created by this team was to initiate and create a yarning circle on the school campus.

Community members and Elders are critical partners and an essential source of knowledge on the needs, opportunities, priorities, and aspirations of their communities. Through the guidance and support of our Indigenous Support Officer, local Elders and engagement with relevant stakeholders (including the Indigenous Student Leader, student group and families) an action plan was developed to create this unique, symbolic and accessible space for all. The Yarning Circle was shared and celebrated with the school community through an official opening ceremony during NAIDOC Week 2020 attended by local Elders, who performed a smoking ceremony and Indigenous dance performance.

Approximately five years ago, a small team of early childhood professionals from different organisations and community groups joined together with the common goal of embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures in the community and formed Our Nangara Group. The group consists of Uncle Barry Watson local Elder in residence (Communities for Children), Sharon Saunders Senior Inclusion Professional (Inclusion Support QLD), Kylie Peel (Daisy Hill Primary School), Kristy Morgan (Goodstart Early Learning), Judith Williams (Rosies Early Learning) and Kellie Still (We Belong Family Day Care). The group meets monthly to plan and organise community events every year, including its largest event, NAIDOC.

Held on a local primary school oval, with stalls and entertainment suitable for children aged birth to 12 years, the NAIDOC event continues to grow each year, with between 200–300 attendees in 2019. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander performers and dancers, as well as professionals, are employed to perform a smoking ceremony and Welcome to Country, with caterers employed to serve traditional food to all clients and children.

Marsden State School (MSS) is committed to championing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and histories. In 2018, MSS engaged with Aboriginal leaders to collaboratively build an Indigenous garden, showcasing bush tucker, a yarning circle, smoking ceremony area and traditional dance space. This space, named ‘Durithunga’, meaning ‘to grow’, was officially opened in 2019 with a Welcome to Country and smoking ceremony, celebrating the new and evolving partnerships with Indigenous leaders, ARTIE Academy, Logan City Parks Depot and P&C Association.

In 2020, a committee consisting of 13 staff and parents formed and developed a Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP). The committee’s first task was to create a reconciliation experience enabling students to learn about the history and show respect to the First Nations peoples of the land.

In May 2020, students took part in an interactive learning walk, using digital devices to move throughout the school, viewing and discussing a series of short movies sharing the Indigenous perspective of significant events. Each student contributed to a ‘Reconciliation Wall’ with a decorated footprint. The videos produced as part of the reconciliation walk remain an essential and valued resource for future lessons and reconciliation weeks. The initiative built the cultural capacity of staff and provided opportunities for students to reflect and learn about reconciliation.

Health and wellbeing:

Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) North Australia is a not-for-profit organisation that supports seriously ill children and their families through practical care programs. As many as 75 per cent of families who access their programs are from an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background. Within the region, many First Nations residents live in extremely remote areas, facing additional hardships in accessing health screening and treatment. Distance to services and associated costs, and cultural fear of medical conditions and treatments are common barriers to accessing services. RMHC North Australia is working to Close the Gap by improving access to health services for early detection and treatment of health conditions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families across its programs.

Separate from its practical care programs that work to Close the Gap, the organisation’s cultural inclusion program encompasses the charity’s governance structure, cultural comfort practices and awareness-building activities, including:

  • an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Group established in 2012, which works collaboratively to promote the understanding and respect of the different backgrounds, ensuring everyone feels culturally safe, included and welcome
  • an Innovate Reconciliation Action Plan developed in 2019
  • an innovative family welcome video developed in 2019, promoting cultural diversity and ensuring an efficient admission process that further eases families’ stress during an already difficult time
  • cultural awareness training made available to all staff and volunteers, with a digital version developed in 2020 to ensure maximum accessibility
  • locally designed cultural artwork incorporated in program branding.

Wheels of Wellness (WOW) was founded in 2014 and became a registered charity in November 2018. The aim of the charitable organisation is to deliver holistic, multi-disciplinary and quality health care for all people of all backgrounds and cultures with no judgement, and for those who fall through the gaps of traditional primary health care service delivery models. This involves delivering care to communities’ most vulnerable and at times invisible community members. WOW’s clients include those who are homeless, sleeping rough, couch surfing or those at risk of homelessness. They care for those with substance abuse, domestic violence, mental health, acute and chronic disease issues. WOW’s flexible service delivery model by being both mobile, fixed and offering doctors has also resulted in decreasing patient numbers and wait times at Cairns Base Hospital Emergency department.

Clinics are run from a car, a van and fixed spaces in partner organisations such as the WOW Hub, Anglicare, Youth Empowered Towards Independence, Douglas House and Quigley Street Shelter and via various street side locations. The organisation has a shared goal of achieving a multidisciplinary approach to addressing both the health and housing needs of clients. This involves working after‐hours in difficult situations and the ability to work in a rapidly changing environment, with highly complex clients with complicated health needs.

The service has grown remarkably since being established, evidenced by formal reporting, client and stakeholder feedback and increased utilisation of services. Service use has increased exponentially from 922 contacts in 2018–19 to 2225 contacts in 2019–20.

The Bama Services support and wellbeing program provides continuous support to workers to help enable them to be their best selves. The program enables workers to address challenging issues and assists with performance responsibilities to develop and enhance skills, experience and potential. Working in partnership across Bama’s functional areas, the support and wellbeing program offers ongoing case management where issues are identified, monitored and support provided through regular one-on-one sessions.

The program was initiated in 2015, offering support to all Bama employees, addressing barriers and challenges experienced to gain and maintain long-term employment. The program develops and enhances their confidence, skills, experience and employment potential to create an environment that is supportive of all employees and assists them to realise their full potential, irrespective of their previous issues and challenges.

Partnership:

The Northern Peninsula Area (NPA) Licensing Muster Initiative is a justice reinvestment strategy that has been providing cross-agency, holistic, evidence-based, proactive and culturally safe support to the five remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities of the NPA (Bamaga, Injinoo, New Mapoon, Seisia and Umagico) around licensing, registration and identity documents since 2019.

The initiative aims to reduce unnecessary contact that Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples experience with the criminal justice system related to driving and vehicle related offending. Such contact often leads to offenders being sent to correctional facilities located thousands of kilometres away from their community. The flow-on impacts of incarceration are significant and cause ongoing trauma and disruption for that person, their family and the wider community.

The initiative arose through prolonged observation of the high numbers of community members facing court action and punishment for non-violent driving-related offences, as well as social and economic exclusion. It became apparent that many community members faced significant barriers to getting and maintaining a licence, including lack of access to basic services other Australians take for granted, language barriers (English is a second, if not third, language for most in the NPA), cultural safety concerns (for example, owing to the lack of recognition of cultural practices like Torres Strait Islander Traditional Adoption), cost of getting a licence, low birth registration rates and a subsequent lack of consistent and sufficient evidence of identity necessary to get a licence.

The Muster has worked closely with the NPA communities to develop targeted, holistic and evidence-based responses to these barriers, bringing together (or "Mustering") key government and non-government services to more effectively meet community need. As of May 2021, more than 33 percent of the NPA licensable population (persons over 16 years) have been assisted through the Muster. Approximately 38 percent of Muster participants were assisted with securing or amending a primary identity document necessary to obtain a licence. Young people in particular have been a focus of the program, with 128 school enrolled participants aged 16 to 18 years assisted with checking their birth registration status, applying for a birth certificate, Proof of Age card and/or learner licence. A further 61 participants have attended workshops and successfully sat for their learner licence.

Jabalbina Yalanji Aboriginal Corporation and Rainforest 4 Foundation share values of protecting the Daintree’s globally significant conservation and cultural values while reconnecting people with Country. The two organisations have formed a unique partnership which sees collaborative efforts to identify Daintree properties, originally sub-divided in the 1980s, with high cultural and conservation values. Rainforest 4 Foundation activates its supporter base to raise funds to purchase the properties. Once the blocks are purchased, the title is transferred to Jabalbina which determines the best course of action in terms of reconnecting people with Country and allowing the land to heal. Jabalbina Yalanji Aboriginal Corporation also works to have the land added to the Daintree National Park.

Both organisations have sought out this partnership based on mutual values focussed on self-determination for custodians of Country, protecting cultural, biodiversity and conservation values of Country and working collaboratively to understand issues and develop solutions. As an Aboriginal land holding entity with 75 per cent Indigenous staff, Jabalbina manages the process of returning land back to Eastern Kuku Yalanji people and protecting it in perpetuity as part of the Daintree National Park.

The partnership is the only formalised non-government program in Australia that purchases land for conservation to be owned and managed by its Traditional Owners. Jabalbina Yalanji provides cultural expertise, ranger experience and staff to steer the project, and Rainforest 4 Foundation provides expertise in fundraising and advocacy for rainforests.

The Raine Island Recovery Project is a collaboration between Wuthathi and Meriam Nation (Ugar, Mer, Erub) Traditional Owners, BHP, the Queensland Government, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA), and the Great Barrier Reef Foundation to restore the world’s largest green turtle nesting area.

Nowhere on Earth do more green turtles come to nest than Raine Island, with 90 per cent of the northern Great Barrier Reef green turtle population migrating to the island. Raine Island is also the most important seabird rookery in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area and is a significant cultural and story place for Aboriginal peoples and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

For more than 30 years, Raine Island’s green turtle population was in decline. Changes in the island’s landscape caused nests to flood and adult turtles perished, falling from treacherous cliffs and becoming trapped in rocks.

In 2015, the Raine Island Recovery Project was formed to bring together Traditional Owners, science, government and business to implement practical solutions at Raine Island. This ambitious, world first conservation program is reversing the fate of this declining turtle rookery and paving the way for co-management between reef managers and Traditional Owners in the Great Barrier Reef.

Thanks to this collaboration, an extra 640,000 turtle hatchings have begun life on the Reef and millions more are expected to be born over the next decade.

The project is also making a considerable contribution towards enabling Traditional Owners to take ownership of the long-term management of Raine Island. There have been 1024 days of funded Traditional Owner employment and the project has supported two-way information sharing, building the capacity of Indigenous rangers and providing opportunities for Traditional Owners to share traditional knowledge and cultural heritage advice.

The Douglas Shire covers a coastline area of 2445 square kilometres squared and is home to more than 12,000 residents. The Shire comprises of approximately 7.7 per cent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population and is the traditional country of the Easter Kuku Yalanji and Yirrganydji tribal groups.

In 2019, Douglas Shire Council initiated a partnership with Jabalbina Yalanji Aboriginal Corporation (Jabalbina), the Registered Native Title Body Corporate for Eastern Kuku Yalanji bubu (land). The partnership was created to coordinate the rollout of bilingual signage across the Yalanji regions of the Shire, known as the Indigenous Language Signage (ILS) program. The program was fully funded by Douglas Shire Council to the value of $95,000, with Jabalbina providing the services of its Cultural Heritage Officer and in-kind support. Through the formation of a paid signage committee comprising of Elder and younger representatives, a list of place names for regions was compiled. Further paid consultation by the committee, with more than 25 Elders and Traditional Owners participating, saw a map prepared for the bilingual ‘Place’ signs. These ‘Place’ signs were installed throughout 2020.

In addition to ‘Place’ signs, ‘Welcome to Country’ and ‘Welcome to Town’ signs were also included in the ILS program and have been installed. These signs were developed in partnership with the Department of Transport and Main Roads (TMR). The standard TMR ‘Welcome to Town’ sign templates were adapted for Mossman and Daintree Village to feature artworks by two Easter Kuku Yalanji artists, whose designs were commissioned by Council, a first for Australia.

Premier’s Reconciliation Award

Jabalbina Yalanji Aboriginal Corporation and Rainforest 4 Foundation share values of protecting the Daintree’s globally significant conservation and cultural values while reconnecting people with Country. The two organisations have formed a unique partnership which sees collaborative efforts to identify Daintree properties, originally sub-divided in the 1980s, with high cultural and conservation values. Rainforest 4 Foundation activates its supporter base to raise funds to purchase the properties. Once the blocks are purchased, the title is transferred to Jabalbina which determines the best course of action in terms of reconnecting people with Country and allowing the land to heal. Jabalbina Yalanji Aboriginal Corporation also works to have the land added to the Daintree National Park.

Both organisations have sought out this partnership based on mutual values focussed on self-determination for custodians of Country, protecting cultural, biodiversity and conservation values of Country and working collaboratively to understand issues and develop solutions. As an Aboriginal land holding entity with 75 per cent Indigenous staff, Jabalbina manages the process of returning land back to Eastern Kuku Yalanji people and protecting it in perpetuity as part of the Daintree National Park.

The partnership is the only formalised non-government program in Australia that purchases land for conservation to be owned and managed by its Traditional Owners. Jabalbina Yalanji provides cultural expertise, ranger experience and staff to steer the project, and Rainforest 4 Foundation provides expertise in fundraising and advocacy for rainforests.

Read about previous winners and finalists.

The Queensland Reconciliation Awards is an initiative of the Queensland Government through the Department of the Premier and Cabinet, and the Department of Seniors, Disability Services and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships.

Sponsors of the 2021 Queensland Reconciliation Awards

The 2021 Queensland Reconciliation Awards was proudly supported by:

Business

Proudly supported by BOQ.

BOQ is one of Australia’s leading regional banks and one of the few not owned by a big bank. BOQ offers a full range of personal and business banking services, all delivered with friendly and personalised service. The BOQ Group is a national bank with a number of brands, which include BOQ, Virgin Money, BOQ Specialist and BOQ Finance.

Bank of Queensland

Community

Proudly supported by The University of Queensland.

UQ’s mission is to create change that positively influences society by engaging in the pursuit of excellence through the creation, preservation, transfer and application of knowledge. We aspire to make Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledges an integral component of this mission. We aim towards increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participation and success in higher education through culturally inclusive environments and practices.

University of Queensland

Education

Proudly supported by James Cook University.

James Cook University (JCU) is a leading tertiary institution in North Queensland and is ranked in the top 250 universities in the world1. The JCU Indigenous Education and Research Centre is a leader in providing Indigenous education research and engagement through successful and sustainable programs and services.

1The World University Rankings 2021

James Cook University

Health and wellbeing

Proudly supported by Santos.

A proudly Australian company, Santos is a leading supplier of natural gas, a fuel for the future providing cleaner energy to improve the lives of people in Australia and Asia. For 65 years, Santos has been working in partnership with local communities, providing jobs and safely and sustainably developing Australia’s natural gas resources.

Santos

Partnership

Proudly supported by Queensland University of Technology.

The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) is the proud sponsor of the Partnership category of the 2021 Queensland Reconciliation Awards.  QUT recognises the vital importance of strong and effective partnerships to achieve our real-world vision and priorities. The university is committed to developing partnerships that are led by and developed with Indigenous Australians and that respond to their needs and aspirations.

University of Queensland