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Rangers protecting the Reef

Rangers are present on and around the Great Barrier Reef every single day. The Reef and the islands are their passion and their on-the-ground action contributes to its health and resilience.

Two groups working to protect the Reef, local waterways and coastal lands are the Indigenous Land and Sea Rangers and Field Management Program rangers.

Ranger actions include cleaning up shore lines, controlling pests, providing visitor infrastructure, biodiversity monitoring, responding to incidents and educating others.

Highlights

Queensland Indigenous Land and Sea Rangers care for land and sea country across 17 regional communities. Many of the Indigenous Land and Sea Rangers are traditional owners of the land they manage and through their roles bring together traditional cultures and practices with environmental management based on the best available science.

There are currently 76 rangers working to preserve Queensland’s natural wonders through activities such as fire management, weed and feral animal management and biodiversity surveys.

Many Indigenous Land and Sea Rangers undertake Junior Ranger programs in their local communities, sharing their first-hand experience with school students and introducing them to land and sea management.

Photo courtesy: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority.

Rangers, operating under the Field Management Program, deliver essential services across the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area to protect and maintain marine and island ecosystems.

Field rangers monitor important turtle and seabird breeding islands, remove pests, develop walking tracks and camping areas, conduct compliance activities, survey vulnerable species, respond to environmental incidents, welcome visitors and conduct controlled burns to prevent wildfires.

The Field Management Program is delivered by the Queensland Government’s Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority.

Other resources

How you can help

From the Great Barrier Reef to Moreton Bay, all Queensland waterways are connected. There are things all of us can do to help. For example, avoiding littering, wherever you live, will prevent litter getting into waterways and making its way to the Great Barrier Reef. If you live in Reef catchment areas, you can make sure soil and fertiliser stays on your property.

When visiting the Reef, you can help the rangers by enjoying the Reef responsibly and participating in a Citizen Science program to monitor the health of corals and marine animals.

Find out more about how you can help