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Border restrictions

Border Restrictions Direction (No. 24)

What has changed from 1am AEST 11 June 2021

  • The Local Government Areas in Victoria that are not in Greater Melbourne have been removed as hotspots. The 31 Local Government Areas that make up Greater Melbourne are still declared COVID-19 hotspots.
    • Anyone who has been in Greater Melbourne in the last 14 days or since the start date identified for the hotspot (whichever is shorter) will not be allowed to enter Queensland, except for a limited range of people who can enter for essential purposes.
  • Anyone who has been in Victoria in the last 14 days must apply for a Queensland Border Declaration Pass at least three business days before they enter Queensland.

Overview

COVID-19 hotspots are updated regularly. Currently Greater Melbourne is a declared hotspot.

People who have been in a COVID-19 hotspot in the last 14 days or since the start date identified for the hotspot (whichever is shorter) will not be allowed to enter Queensland, except for a limited range of people who can enter for essential purposes.

People who are permitted to enter Queensland who have been in a COVID-19 hotspot within the last 14 days or since the start date identified for the hotspot (whichever is shorter) will have to quarantine for 14 days at government arranged accommodation. Queensland residents who have been in a COVID-19 hotspot can return home by air and new residents can relocate to Queensland but, they will have to quarantine in government arranged accommodation at their own expense.

You are only allowed to enter Queensland if you have been in a hotspot in the last 14 days or since the start date identified for the hotspot (whichever is shorter), if:

  • your usual residence is in Queensland or you are moving to Queensland
  • you need to comply with an order to attend a Court or Tribunal in-person in Queensland or to give effect to orders of the Court or Tribunal in-person in Queensland
  • you have to fulfil an arrangement or obligation relating to shared parenting or child contact
  • you have to assist with or participate in a State or Commonwealth law enforcement investigation or other action at the request or direction of a State or Commonwealth department or law enforcement agency
  • you need to come to Queensland to complete an essential activity
  • you arrive into Queensland by air and you transfer directly to another flight to leave Queensland and don’t leave the airport or remain in quarantine until your flight out of Queensland
  • you arrive to the Gold Coast airport from an approved airport and transit directly by road to leave Queensland without leaving your vehicle
  • you are a student at a higher education institution or boarding school and are entering Queensland for study, parents and legal guardians are allowed to accompany students who are minors
  • you are entering to receive essential health care or to provide support to a person receiving essential health care
  • can provide evidence that you completed mandatory hotel quarantine in a COVID-19 hotspot and immediately transited to Queensland.

You will have to provide evidence of the above when entering Queensland.

You will be required to complete 14 days mandatory quarantine in government arranged accommodation at your own expense unless exceptional circumstances apply.

If you are exempt from quarantine because you are in Queensland to complete an essential activity, you will need to keep and retain records of close contacts whilst you are in Queensland for two weeks after you arrive in Queensland.

Anyone who arrives in Queensland and has been in a COVID-19 hotspot in the last 14 days or since the start date identified for the hotspot (whichever is shorter) will need to apply for a Queensland Border Declaration Pass before they enter Queensland. Anyone who has been in a state or territory with a COVID-19 hotspot will also need to apply for a Queensland Border Declaration Pass before they enter Queensland.

Essential health care

You can enter Queensland from a hotspot for essential health care without an exemption when the health care cannot be provided in the hotspot.

Essential health care is any:

  • Queensland Children’s Hospital appointment confirmed in writing by the hospital
  • appointment at a Queensland Hospital and Health Service or associated outreach location, confirmed in writing by the service
  • appointment at a licensed Queensland private health facility or ancillary clinic or service, confirmed in writing by the service or health practitioner
  • appointment at an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Controlled Health Service confirmed in writing by the service
  • appointment with a prescribed health practitioner at another premises, confirmed on the form approved by the Chief Health Officer.

    Please note: An appointment with a prescribed health practitioner may include services provided by a registered NDIS provider under an agreed NDIS Plan. An appointment at an ancillary clinic or service may include an appointment at a rehabilitation service.

You will be required to enter Queensland by air and comply with quarantine requirements. If you are admitted to a hospital or other facility you will be able to quarantine at the facility. Otherwise, you will need to quarantine in government arranged accommodation at your own expense.

Read more about entering Queensland for essential health care.

Enforcement

The Queensland Police Service will meet all arrivals by air and will be completing random spot checks by road to enforce the requirements.

There are also penalties for providing false or misleading information. If you breach any of the requirements under the Borders restrictions Direction, you may be subject to enforcement, including an on the spot fine of $4,003, a court-imposed penalty of up to $13,345 or 6 months' imprisonment.

If you provide false, misleading or incorrect information on a Border Declaration it is an offence punishable by a fine of $4,003, a court-imposed penalty of up to $13,345 or 6 months' imprisonment.

For more information see the full Border Restrictions Direction (No. 24)

Questions and Answers about this direction

Questions about face masks

I receive care at my own home, do I have to wear a mask?

You are not required to wear a mask when inside your home. However, the carer or healthcare worker providing care must wear a mask.

How can I wear a face mask if I have a hearing aid?

If you wear a hearing aid we recommend considering wearing a mask that ties around your head, rather than over the ears to ensure the ties do not get tangled in your hearing aid.

Find out how to use, wear and dispose of a face mask.

How do I stop my face mask fogging up my glasses?

Try one of these tips to help prevent your face mask fogging your glasses:

  • make sure your face mask is fitted and pinched on your nose if possible
  • put your glasses on after your mask
  • wash your glasses with detergent and water to create a film to prevent fogging
  • use micropore tape (available at pharmacies) to tape the mask along the bridge of your nose and cheeks, then put your glasses on top
  • put a folded tissue across the bridge of your nose, then put your mask on with your glasses on top.

Find out how to use, wear and dispose of a face mask.

How do I wear a mask correctly if I have a big beard?

Ensure the mask covers your nose and mouth, regardless of any facial hair. For non-medical face masks, you do not have to achieve a seal with the mask against the skin of your face.

There are different shapes and sizes of fabric non-medical masks available, some of which may be a more comfortable option if you have facial hair.

Can I remove my face mask to smoke or use an e-cigarette?

Yes, subject to existing restrictions on smoking in public places in Queensland.

While there isn’t enough evidence to be certain that people who smoke are more likely to be infected by COVID-19, the act of smoking means that fingers are in contact with your lips which increases the possibility of transmission of virus from hand to mouth.

Find out more about smoking and COVID-19.

I wear traditional or religious garments that cover my head or face, do I have to wear a mask?

Yes. There are a range of face masks available that can be worn with traditional and religious garments. These include face masks that are tied around the head, rather than looped over the ears.

If you wear a face covering, like a veil or scarf, you should wear your face mask beneath this, so it is fitted to your face.

Find out how to use, wear and dispose of a face mask.

Questions about penalties and enforcement

Are there penalties if I don’t comply?

Yes. If you don’t comply you may be given an on-the-spot fine of $1,378 for individuals and $6,892 for corporations, a court-imposed penalty of up to $13,785 or 6 months' imprisonment. If you refuse a police direction to wear a face mask, you could be given an on-the-spot fine of $206.

How is this being enforced?

Queensland Police and enforcement officers will enforce these restrictions.

At the airport and on flights

Airlines can stop someone from boarding a domestic flight or flying with the airline (for a period of time determined by the airline) if they refuse to wear a face mask.

Although airlines are not responsible for enforcing compliance, they can report non-compliance to the Queensland Police Service or Australian Federal Police through their current processes.

Queensland Police Service and Australian Federal Police officers may take action if a person refuses to wear a face mask without a lawful reason. A person may be given a move-on direction to not board a flight or to leave the airport for up to a 24-hour period. If someone refuses a police direction to wear a mask, police officers can issue an on-the-spot fine of $206, an infringement notice, or a notice to appear in court.