Skip links and keyboard navigation

Threatened wildlife

Each of Queensland's native plants and animals is a unique and valuable part of our state's rich biodiversity. Yet, some of these species have declined in numbers and are even threatened with extinction.

Threatened species classifications and criteria are listed below.

Endangered

A species may be declared ‘endangered’ if any of the following apply:

  • there have not been thorough searches conducted for the species and it has't been seen in the wild over a period that is appropriate for its life cycle or form
  • the habitat or distribution of the species has been reduced to an extent that it may be in danger of extinction
  • the population size of the species has declined, or is likely to decline, to an extent that it may be in danger of extinction
  • the survival of the wildlife in the wild is unlikely if a threatening process continues.

View a list of Queensland’s:

Extinct in the wild

A species may be declared  ‘extinct’ in the wild if:

  • there have been thorough searches conducted for the species
    and 
  • the species has't been seen in the wild over a period that is appropriate for its life cycle or form.

View a list of Queensland’s:

Least concern

A species may be declared ‘least concern’ if:

  • the species is common or abundant and is likely to survive in the wild.

A species may be declared least concern even if:

  • the species is being threatened
  • the population size or distribution of the wildlife has declined
  • there is insufficient information about the wildlife to conclude whether the wildlife is common or abundant or likely to survive in the wild.

All animals previously listed as common are now listed as least concern.

All plants, birds, reptiles and amphibians indigenous to Australia—other than those that are extinct in the wild, endangered, vulnerable or near threatened wildlife—are least concern wildlife.

Near threatened

A species may be declared ‘near threatened’ if any of the below apply:

  • the population size or distribution of the wildlife is small and may become smaller
  • the population size of the wildlife has declined, or is likely to decline, at a rate higher than the usual rate for population changes for the wildlife
  • the survival of the wildlife in the wild is affected to an extent that the wildlife is in danger of becoming ‘vulnerable’.

View a list of Queensland’s

Vulnerable

A species may be declared ‘vulnerable’ if any of the conditions below apply:

  • its population is decreasing because of threatening processes
  • its population has been seriously depleted and its protection is not secured
  • its population, while abundant, is at risk because of threatening processes
  • its population is low or localised or depends on limited habitat that is at risk because of threatening processes.

View a list of Queensland’s

Who may be sharing your backyard?

Check Wildlife Online for a list of animals in your area.

Licence
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia (CC BY 3.0)
Last updated
26 April 2013

Page feedback

  1. How satisfied are you with your experience today? *