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Fire danger rating

Fire danger rating (FDR) is an indicator of potential fire danger. In a bushfire, the FDR can change rapidly, depending on conditions. Be aware of bushfire alerts in your area and listen to local radio for updates.

The rating scale

Catastrophic

Fires are likely to be uncontrollable, unpredictable and very fast-moving with highly aggressive flames extending high above treetops and buildings.

What to do

Even well-prepared and constructed homes will not be safe. If catastrophic fires are expected in your area, evacuate yourself and your family to safety as soon as possible.

Extreme

Fires may be uncontrollable, unpredictable and fast-moving with flames in the treetops, and higher than rooftops.

What to do

Even well-prepared and constructed homes will not be safe. Leaving early (hours before) a fire occurs is the safest option for you and your family.

Severe

Fires may be uncontrollable and fast-moving with flames that may be higher than rooftops.

What to do

Leaving early will always be the safest option. Staying and defending your property is only an option if your home is well-prepared, and you are capable of actively defending it.

Very high

Fires can be difficult to control with flames that may burn into treetops. Loss of life and damage to property is still a threat.

What to do

Staying and defending your property is an option if your home is well-prepared, and you are capable of actively defending it.

High

Fires can be controlled but loss of life and damage to property is still a threat.

What to do

Ensure that you, your family and property are prepared for the risk of bushfire. Monitor the situation for any changes.

Low–moderate

Fires can be easily controlled and pose little threat to people or property.

What to do

Review your bushfire survival plan and monitor the situation for any changes.

What homes require smoke alarm?

Under Queensland law:

  • All homes and units in Queensland must be fitted with smoke alarms
  • Homes built before 1 July 1997 must have at least one 9-volt battery-operated smoke alarm
  • Homes built or significantly renovated after 1 July 1997 must have a 240-volt (hard-wired) smoke alarm.

How many smoke alarms do you need?

Queensland Fire and Emergency suggest that homes should have:

  • A smoke alarm outside each sleeping area and on each level of the home
  • In a single-level home, 1 alarm may be enough (as a minimum) if all the bedrooms connect to a common hallway
  • Additional alarms in homes with separated sleeping areas
  • A smoke alarm in each bedroom and the hallway if you sleep with the bedroom doors closed.
Last updated
18 November, 2011

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